SVCC Libraries Closed Until Further Notice

SVCC Libraries Closed Until Further Notice – Support for Temporary Online Teaching & Learning

 

All SVCC Libraries' physical spaces are closed until further notice in an effort to foster community health and help slow the spread of COVID-19. Library staff and faculty continue to support our SVCC community to teach, learn, research, and access our resources online. 

We have expanded our online support to promote social distancing and keep giving you the help you need. We also offer a wealth of online resources for your research needs.

For Faculty and Students

Off-Campus Access

To access library resources from off-campus, simply use the following steps:

  • Go to the SVCC Homepage (Links to an external site.). 
  • Click on MYSVCC (Links to an external site.). Enter your username and password.
  • Once you log in, click on the “Library Services” tab for remote 24/7 access to our library. 
  • To go to the SVCC library webpage, click on the SVCC logo at the top left of the Primo page. 

Primo 

Primo searches across all of our databases, books, and eBooks at one time, and is a great place to start your research. You can also find our Primo search box on the library homepage . The following video will introduce you to starting your search (https://youtu.be/6M0UOz5P3BY). 

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19 EbscoHost Databases

Why should I use the library databases? Google always gets me what I need.

  • Quality Control. Editors, fact-checkers and even highly trained EXPERTS have approved the database articles before publication. Some are peer-reviewed by experts in the field. This is not some 7th grader’s science project. Take that, Google!
  • Organization. Library resources are organized by format (book, article, DVD) and categorized by topic by real people. Half the work is done for you!
  • Depth. Databases cover topics in detail. Peer-reviewed articles are serious scholarship written by experts. When you use smart sources in your paper, you look smart too.
  • Free with your tuition. Not everything is free on the internet….and many high-quality articles can be viewed for a price. Why not check the library? The library may have already purchased access to this article….and many more besides.
  • Easy citations. Ever tried to find an author’s name on a web page? Databases make easy to find the source. Databases often have tools to help prepare your citations…cut and paste, anyone?
  • Always available. 24/7, on or off-campus.

The following video will introduce you to starting your search https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwdvCs9aFKQ 

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Ask A Librarian!

When the SVCC is not open, there is help still available.  LRCLive is a24/7 chat reference service for Virginia's community college students. When you need assistance, LRCLive connects you to a librarian for help with library services and online research.

http://library.vccs.edu/reference/lol.htm 

 

LRC Live Reference Service


 

Research Information

Search vs Research

You search for information every day, using the internet, texting your friends, or asking around. However, searching for information that helps us navigate our daily lives is different than the kind of searching your professors ask you to do for class. Let's find out what professors generally expect of you when it comes to research. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=minZ0ABVqyk 

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Choosing Your Topic Requires Research

Topic selection, research, and the writing process in college are not easy; they are intertwined and dependent upon each other.

This 3-minute video explains how college research is messier than many realize; it also discusses the importance of performing research early in the assignment process.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0B3Gjlu-1o&feature=youtu.be

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How to Google

Google is a powerful search tool that we use every day. However, searches tend to produce millions of results which are affected by different factors including search history and geographic location. There are many search tips to help you to retrieve better results. https://youtu.be/2NtCXZeYhWM 

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Developing a Search Strategy

Research, like any process with multiple steps, requires a strategy. Seldom do researchers find sources they need on the first try. Watch the video below, think about how you react when you struggle with searching and how you map out the interactions you have in the database. https://youtu.be/4CHKYaJkuO0 

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Understanding Keyword Searching

Effective searching in library resources differs from internet searching.

Typing a question into Google usually retrieves perfect results - this is the power of semantic search engines. Library resources use individual keywords or phrases instead of entire sentences. Watch the video for a further introduction to these basic library search concepts.  https://youtu.be/x9diL8-ZpAk 

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Formulate a Research Question

Strong research papers usually begin with strong research questions. The following video will help you understand why research questions are helpful in guiding you through your research process and what a good research question looks like. 

  • Watch the video below
  • Develop your own research question.
  • Turn your research question into a thesis statement. A thesis statement identifies the main ideas and arguments of a paper. Since the answer(s) to your research question will likely be the central idea of your paper, you can usually create a thesis statement by answering your research question. https://youtu.be/1oJNO6PYZe4 

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Using Wikipedia... or Not

https://youtu.be/jHrGsxSpM5E 

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What are databases?

Understanding the difference between internet searching and database searching is essential for college research. The following video explains what databases are and how they work. It is expected you will be able to apply these principles to your library research. https://youtu.be/Q2GMtIuaNzU 

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How to Read & Use Citations

Citations give researchers basic information about the creation of a document or work of art. The most common citation styles you will use at SVCC are MLA and APA.  Regardless of style, citations tell us the same information about a source including:

  • Who created it
  • What it is called
  • When it was published or created
  • Where it was published or created

Why do we use citations?

  • A citation can help you find additional sources for your research.
  • A citation gives credit to the author/creator whose work you’ve used.
  • A list of citations makes up a Works Cited List (MLA) or References List (APA) which is a list of all of the sources used in your research assignment.

https://youtu.be/mT_1vrs6p_s 

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Searching Opposing Viewpoints and CQ Researcher

There are two databases from the library that are essential resources for many speeches, but persuasive or argumentative ones in particular. Both databases are organized by topic, or issue, and provide stories, context, and evidence that allows you, the researcher, to understand all the ways an issue can be addressed. Reliable evidence is key to a compelling speech or argument.

Please watch the video so you can observe the different ways these databases operate. https://youtu.be/icXnAdMBa_Q 

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Google Scholar in a Nutshell

Google Scholar allows you to search for college-appropriate materials while using the Google search algorithm. To make the most of your searching, watch this video. REMEMBER, Google Scholar is not a substitute for your research. Google Scholar can be used in addition to using your SVCC Library Databases. https://youtu.be/I2kTSpyaRyM 

 

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Evaluating Web Resources

It is important to evaluate information, both for academic and personal use. This is particularly true when you are searching for information on the web.

One way to think about an information source is to use the CRAAP test.  CRAAP is a list of questions that can help you to decide if a particular source is a good fit for your research. https://youtu.be/tVqnamWs91I 

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What is Peer Review?

Professors will ask you to use peer-reviewed, scholarly or academic journals to write your research papers (all of these expressions mean the same thing). This is especially true in higher level, discipline-based classes.  

There are important reasons why this type of article is preferred in higher education.

Watch the video to familiarize yourself with the peer review process and its importance. https://youtu.be/rOCQZ7QnoN0 

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How to Read a Scholarly Article

Your assignment requires that you incorporate scholarly journal articles from the library's databases. You've done your preliminary research, and found a few articles that seem like they might help you answer your research question. https://youtu.be/EEVftUdfKtQ 

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Taking Notes for Research Projects

Taking notes while you're doing research will save you lots of time when you begin writing a draft of your research paper. Keeping clear notes helps you to maintain an organized record of where information comes from, what you were thinking while you were reading, and what new questions you might want to answer. Paraphrasing while you're taking research notes on your topic can also help you to avoid accidental plagiarism.  https://youtu.be/tEnctzdmC3M 

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How to Cite with MLA Style

MLA Style

Using information ethically requires not only summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting, but also giving credit to the original sources and authors for their ideas. In order to do this in a uniform way, the Modern Language Association (MLA) has developed a set of style guidelines that can help you format your paper and use sources ethically. 

In-Text Citations

In-text citations help you give credit to the sources where you found information. This helps you prevent plagiarism in your paper, and helps your readers figure out where information comes from. The first video gives you a brief introduction to creating the in-text citations you'll need to use after you quote, paraphrase, or summarize information.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5igNRmKLug&t=3s 

 Works Cited Entries

The next video helps you to create MLA citations for your Works Cited page. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDGDUOi_92A 

Formatting Your Paper 

This tutorial will help you format your Word Document for MLA style:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMqTfSm7gdA 

This tutorial will help you format your Google Document for MLA style

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPL5v4AXcIw 

 

How to Cite With APA Style

  APA Style

Using information ethically requires not only summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting, but also giving credit to the original sources and authors for their ideas. In order to do this in a uniform way, the American Psychological Association (APA) has developed a set of style guidelines that can help you format your paper and use sources ethically.  

In-Text Citations

 In-text citations help you give credit to the sources where you found information. This helps you prevent plagiarism in your paper, and helps your readers figure out where information comes from. The first video gives you a brief introduction to creating the in-text citations you'll need to use after you quote, paraphrase, or summarize information.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzKlb7E7ERc&feature=emb_title 

References

The next video helps you to create APA citations for your References page. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08inFEhCtjw 

Formatting Your Paper 

This tutorial will help you format your Word Document for APA style:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhHtgSy6smI 

This tutorial will help you format your Google Document for APA style

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QBRt0BTe3w 

Plagiarism

Understanding plagiarism is one of the more difficult aspects of academic work. You may have been exposed to the idea, but still don't really understand what it means or how to avoid it. This video explains the misconceptions that surround plagiarism and the common mistakes everyone makes from time to time. After watching the video, take the quiz to check your understanding. https://youtu.be/od1iSA_rG78

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Other Important Information

If you have any questions or concerns, send us a message at lrsC@southside.edu  and we will reply as soon as we can. 

 

Returning materials

Please do not worry about returning library materials at this time. We will extend all due dates and there will be no late fees charged. 

 

We’re here to help. Please contact us if you have any questions. 

Marika Peterson, College Librarian – marika.peterson@southside.edu

Mary Winfield, Library Specialist (Alberta Campus)- mary.winfield@southside.edu

Judith Vaughan, Library Specialist (Daniel Campus)- judith.vaughan@southside.edu 

 

We will continue to update this page as more information becomes available.

 

See SVCC’s LATEST CORONAVIRUS (COVD-19) UPDATES for up-to-date information.

 

Last updated March 19, 2020, at 3:29 PM EST